Frederick Henry Bay: Clifton Beach (T408)

Cape Contrariety to Cape Deslacs

 

Clifton Beach LOOKING TO CAPE DESLACS
Clifton Beach

After slithering down off Cape Contrariety we took off our shoes, Cathy and I, and walked barefoot along the swash, quickly leaving behind the small groups of swimmers and surfers taking advantage of sunny weather. Soon we had the whole beach to ourselves and forgot completely about the existence of the low lying houses between the beach and Pipe Clay Lagoon, except for when we paused to study the sand dunes, their shape steeply altered by marram grass, their mass being gnawed away at by the sea. The dunes extend about 300m inland and reach a height of about 20 m (Short, 2006) and amongst the native bush growing on their backs is Acacia longifolia and the threatened species Cynoglossum australe.  These Cape Deslacs/Clifton Beach dune fields are a geoconservation site of state significance, and Clifton’s Frederick Henry Bay beach alignment is also considered significant.

Especially along some parts of Bicheno Street the houses here are regarded as being at early risk from sea level rise (Sharples, 2009) and sea level rise will of course impact coastal values too and destroy the dune habitat the Clifton Beach community is currently working to preserve.

We studied the ripple marks and read the southerly swell, counting numerous rips and we observed that apart from a lone juvenile Pacific Gull studying our progress this popular beach, facing south- southeast into Frederick Henry and towards Storm Bay was  that day devoid of birds.

When we reached the end we lingered and with a little assistance from Memory Maps pointed out to each other the landmarks we were observing to the south and then we turned our attention to the cliffs at the base of  Cape Deslacs taking stabs in the dark about the pale rock, before guessing at sandstone.  Later I read that there have been numerous drownings at this northern area of the beach, so it’s a wise swimmer who stays within the flags down the southern end.

Our efforts at amateur geology ending in uncertainty, we walked back down the beach contemplating a stroll around the lagoon on a future low tide and pondering the difficulties Cape Deslacs might pose for our exploring.

 

Further Reading:

Sharples, C.  2009. Climate change impacts on Clarence coastal areas.  Clarence City Council, Clarence.

Short, Andrew. 2006.  Beaches of the Tasmanian coast & islands: a guide to their nature, characteristics, surf and safety.  Sydney University Press, Sydney.

 

Tasflora. 2012.  Clifton Beach Coastal Reserve: reserve activity plan 2012-2016, draft  (revision 3): advice prepared by Tasflora for Clarence City Council. Unpublished report.


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