Frederick Henry Bay & Norfolk Bay Beaches: Pittwater Lagoon to Dunally: The Dodges Ferry Coastline – Tiger Bay, Red Ochre Beach, Blue Lagoon Beach and Spectacle Head

Previous post:  Lewisham to Dodges Ferry (Okines Beach)

In 1952 E.T. Emmett wrote, ‘From Sorell to Hobart you have the choice of keeping to the main road which strikes Bellerive at fourteen miles, or of doubling back to Lewisham, ferrying across to Seven Mile Beach, and walking through Rokeby, a distance of something over twenty miles.  I chose the latter.

Lewisham is another old-timer, for this was once the route to Port Arthur, and Pittwater was crossed at Dodge’s Ferry.  Since then three causeways have been built … Lewisham’s main fame today is based on the good fare at the hostelry and the fat flounders in the bay.  The iron bars at the windows of some of the outhouses explain what the buildings were used for a century ago.’

Tiger Bay Beach  (T395)

Emmett travelled south through a different time and landscape.  Our  walk took us north out of Lewisham and along  Tiger Bay Beach, which lies in the lee of Tiger Head between Okines and Red Ochre Beach.  Short (2006) refers to two Red Ochre Beaches, but the locals seem to call the last beach along Blue Lagoon Beach.

The tide we thought would be low was  high, the vast stretches of sand gone.  We picked our way along the water’s edge and around the eroding cliffs of friable sandstone at Tiger Head.  We found a seat, trees with spaces between their roots and the dune, and the visible signs of human concern – tiles and branches once again heaped there to hold back the ocean’s rising intentions.  This beach has boat sheds, there’s a boat ramp and jetties and several boats were moored off the beach.

Red Ochre Beaches 1 and 2 (aka Blue Lagoon Beach)

We encountered a sandstone outcrop here with lovely patterns and strange little indented circles.

SandstoneRedOchreBeach.JPG

Further along we found more boat sheds and this time a significant effort being made to hold back the sea because the path now ran along the top of  carefully placed boulders, yet still the sea was winkling out the fill and the sand.

Red Ochre Beach

We climbed up onto a thin concrete strip on the side of someone’s garden, clutching on to their fence in order to continue.  But returning on a  low tide occasion I found I could walk the sand beneath the boulders with ease.

The Ferry Man

This was a nautical walk, because on Blue Lagoon Beach we found ourselves amongst more boat sheds, moorings and jetties sheltered this time by the bulk of Spectacle Head.

Ralph Dodge called the land he bought at Dodges Ferry  in 1830 Ferry Farm.  It seems he swapped his house in Goulburn Street for these 300 acres and this bit of history still stands, because the house he built can be found at the end of Fourth Avenue, (Southern Beaches Historical Society, 2019), pretty much opposite Sandy Point .

He was a man with an eye for business, because he took the opportunity to establish a ferry service and standing there with the sea breeze filling in, it required no imagination at all to imagine him rowing his neighbours over to Sandy Point on the other side.  If only all rivers had their Ralph Dodges walking coastlines would be easier and a lot more fun.  Imagining Ralph Dodge I remembered an alpine river in Lesotho where the ferry man challenged his wooden boat with generous loads of locals and read the swirls and rapids with consummate skill while those precariously balanced stayed perfectly silent and perfectly still.  In another lifetime perhaps I’ll aspire to being a ferry woman and spend my days napping under a shady tree in a warmer climate, waiting for occasional travellers to come my way.

Spectacle Island

Spectacle Island, one of the Sloping Group of islands, and a mere 3.5 ha lies just offshore.    A small number of pied oystercatchers, 600 pairs of little penguins and 8000 pairs of short-tailed shearwater had burrows on the island when Nigel Brothers surveyed it (Brothers, 2001).  It belongs to the birds, so respect them by kindly staying away.

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A seagull observed us from the boat ramp as we discussed continuing along the rocks or taking the path we could see heading up Spectacle Head behind the boat sheds.  We observed the tide and chose the latter.

Spectacle Point

Walked Feb 2017

Sources:

Brothers, Nigel. 2001. Tasmania’s offshore islands. Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart.

Emmett, E.T. 1952.  Tasmania by road and track. Melbourne University Press, Melbourne.

Short, Andrew (2006)

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Frederick Henry Bay & Norfolk Bay Beaches: Pitt Water Lagoon to Dunalley: Lewisham and Okines Beaches

Walking with Matisse

Sundra and I had decided to walk from Lewisham to Dunally and for these walks her best friend, Matisse, invariably came too.  Despite his venerable age he always kept up with us and chose to stick with whoever might be lagging, although sometimes he’d set off alone to find a different way around an obstacle.  And ever polite, he accepted us picking him up and passing him over hazards he couldn’t manage alone.  He’d pick up his dignity and continue lightly finding his way.

Rest in peace, gentle Matisse.

Dodges Ferry and Lewisham:  Sharing a Magnificent Landscape

Long ago I met a writer who lived at Dodges Ferry. It was considered an odd choice by my friends, all better acquainted with Hobart than I was at that time, but walking this area I realised the writer was prescient. Its proximity to  vast Pitt Water Lagoon, quiet coves, a string of sheltered beaches, a magnificent headland, beautiful surf beaches and a photogenic river give it an enviable natural richness.

Lewisham consists of a thin string of houses that extend along the eastern shore of the inner entrance to Pitt Water Lagoon just north of Dodges Ferry and so it isn’t physically on Frederick Henry Bay although its watery landscape is intimately connected to the bay.  It strikes me as an under rated place, perched as it is above the water with access  to some lovely beaches via a rambling path.

Dodges Ferry and Lewisham probably don’t want their natural wealth proclaimed to the world less the financially obese rush in and take over.  For the moment laid back Dodges in particular still has enough shacks and rutted roads to keep it feeling like an authentic holiday village.

It’s about a 35 minute drive from Hobart to Lewisham and Dodges Ferry and it’s rich with water views  if you choose to take the Lewisham Scenic Drive turn off.  It’s my firm belief that one should always take the scenic route and  for this series of walks it was such a no brainer that without fail we did.

Walking the Lewisham Reef

There’s a boat ramp at Lewisham and moorings offshore, and the spit that is Five Mile Beach with its bright white dunes  backed by pine forest forms the opposite shore.  Water flows in and out of the lagoon to Tiger Head Bay and larger Frederick Henry Bay through a narrow channel at Sandy Point on the Five Mile side and Dodges on the northern, and responds to the lay of the land by swirling and rippling in interesting ways.

After considerable discussion we began our walk at the boat ramp and chose to go boulder hopping in preference to taking the path a sailing friend had told me hugged the shore.  Sundra’s miniature poodle, Matisse, hopped from one lichened rock to the next with a grace and dexterity that belied his venerable twenty something years.

Lewisham reef and lichen with S and Matisse
Along the reef at Lewisham: Sundra and Matisse

 

The lichens, in various hues, indicated the highest reach of the tide.

Lewisham reef and a paler lichen

As well, there was dolerite weathering in interesting ways.

Lewisham rock formation along the reef

 

Quiet place on Lewisham Reef
Quietitude along the reef

Boat Houses

Eventually we climbed up to the path and discovered that one of the particularly  enjoyable aspects of this walk is the number of boat houses tucked into the cliff, each quite idiosyncratic.  Boats lie about on the shore, silently emanating the richness  of their mysterious lives, and jetties are also stop-and-enjoy features along this varied track.  Just like on the Derwent and the D’Entrecasteaux, casuarinas (she oaks) fringe the shore, providing light shade and there are three or four ‘covelets’ depending on how you want to define stretches and pockets of sand divided by man-made features or natural indentations.  Where these exist, so do the boat houses, which in many cases look to be tiny weekend beach shacks.

Lewisham and the view broadens
The tide was not yet out when we reached this vantage point
Lewisham, boat house and boats
After the jetty we came across this  cove.

Lewisham Beach  & Okines Beach (T396)

The path led us  to a beach that a passer by told us was called Lewisham Beach. Sundra was struggling to pronounce the word ‘Lewisham’ and so we agreed that we’d call it the Hamlet of Lewis, which made the place feel pleasantly foreign. I’d thought this particular beach was called Okines but one thing I have discovered about walking beaches is that both they and their names can be transient and confusing.  Sorell Council refers to a Lewisham and an Okines Beach and they should know.  Short (2006) doesn’t reference a Lewisham Beach.  I expect they simply segue into each other and did so without us noticing.

As the tide receded the landscape transformed into vast stretches of sand  interleaved with shallow fingers of water, leaving a deep channel over on the Five Mile Beach side of what a little earlier had been a single stretch of water.   A few groups with fishing rods  had strolled over there  and tiny clicking noises emanated from the entrances of a million tiny tunnels as the more permanent inhabitants of this  sweep of fabulousness, the soldier crabs, began popping up everywhere and marching off together across the watery stretches of sand like endless pink ribbons.  It was hard to find any vacant land on which to place our Gulliver-like feet.

Lewisham Beach and cloud street
Cloud street over Lewisham beach

Lewisham Beach and clouds, shells and water

Transcient Landscapes

We looked at the ripple marks in the sand, practising our reading of tide and current. There were other clues to the life of the beach.  Groins indicated local concern about beach loss and the wrack line showed that this was valid.  It was right up against the base of the dunes and we wondered whether the marram grass and the houses themselves had affected beach replenishment.  Sundra exchanged pleasantries with a landowner industriously chucking branches down to the base of the dune to join the others strewn there in an effort at holding back the weight and determination of water.

We met some walkers who told us they’d seen a large fish head with a protruding tongue and odd curls on its face and although they told us where to find it we never encountered it, just a hoard of jellyfish patiently waiting for wind and water to carry them back out to sea.

Sometimes the weather and a beach are so compelling that it pays to dawdle and lose yourself in the interesting lives of crustaceans, invertebrates, boulders and curly faced strangers from the watery depths.   We idled and we lingered until at last we reached the rivulet.  We had taken hours, but Dodges Ferry and Spectacle Head were still simply a distant view. and so we agreed we’d come back  on the next good low tide.

 

Lewisham Beach coastal erosion
Beach erosion at Lewisham
Lewisham Rivulet
Lewisham Rivulet

Okines Beach History

I discovered a little  history on the Southern Beaches Historical Society website.

There’s a natural spring and a wetland behind the beach, which would have once been handy for the Moomairemener who had been pushed out of their country by the time Ralph Dodge, born on Norfolk Island (and one of the group of settlers who came to Van Diemen’s Land in 1807/1808) was granted this land in 1864.  He and his wife Charlotte called it Lagoon Farm and in time it passed to their youngest son, Robert, who with his wife Harriet raised nine children here, before selling the farm to the Crown for the new Soldier Resettlement Grants Scheme that was set up for the soldiers back from World War I.

Ernest Okines was the lucky recipient and as with many beaches the foreshore’s name became linked to the owner.  Today the Dodges Ferry Primary School stands on this land – the old homestead was demolished in the 1990s.